Avian Immunology 3rd edition

Avian Immunology 3rd edition PDF

By Bernd Kaspers , Karel A. Schat, Thomas Göbel, Lonneke Vervelde

Avian Immunology 3rd Edition PDF contains a detailed description of the avian innate immune system, encompassing the mucosal, enteric, respiratory and reproductive systems. The diseases and disorders it covers, include immunodepressive diseases and immune evasion, autoimmune diseases, and tumors of the immune system. Practical aspects of vaccination are examined as well. Extensive appendices summarize resources for scientists including cell lines, inbred chicken lines, cytokines, chemokines, and monoclonal antibodies. With contributions from the foremost international experts in the field, Avian Immunology 3rd, provides the most up-to-date crucial information not only for poultry health professionals and avian biologists, but also for comparative and veterinary immunologists, graduate students, and veterinary students with an interest in avian immunology. Avian Immunology 3rd edition is a fascinating and growing field and surely provides new and exciting insights for mainstream immunology in the future.

  • Reflects significant advances in the field since the second edition, particularly the explosion of knowledge on genomics including work on the chicken, turkey and zebra finch genomes
  • Provides a single source reference ranging from the basic science to cutting edge research
  • Provides practical information for veterinarians particularly those specialised in poultry or companion bird medicine
  • New chapters on the impact of the microbiome on the immune system, defence mechanisms in the egg and embryo and emerging transgene technologies
Table of Contents
  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • List of contributors
  • Foreword
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1. The importance of the avian immune system and its unique features
  • Abstracts
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 The contribution from avian lymphocytes
  • 1.3 Contribution of the bursa of Fabricius
  • 1.4 The contribution of the chicken MHC
  • 1.5 Contributions to vaccinology
  • 1.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Structure of the avian lymphoid system
  • Abstract
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 The thymus
  • 2.3 The bursa of Fabricius
  • 2.4 The spleen
  • 2.5 Gut-associated lymphoid tissue
  • 2.6 Harderian gland
  • 2.7 Mural lymph node
  • 2.8 Ectopic lymphatic tissue and pineal gland
  • 2.9 Bone marrow
  • 2.10 Blood
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Development of the avian hematopoietic and immune systems
  • Abstract
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Origins and migration routes of hematopoietic cells using quail/chicken complementary chimeras
  • 3.3 Aortic clusters as the intraembryonic source of definitive hematopoiesis
  • 3.4 Formation of the aorta: a dorsal angioblastic lineage and a ventral hemangioblasts lineage
  • 3.5 Developing an in vitro model of hemogenic endothelium commitment and endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition
  • 3.6 Spatiotemporal emergence and organization of the chicken IAHCs
  • 3.7 Ecs of the late fetus/young adult bone marrow harbor hemogenic potential and generate multilineage hematopoiesis
  • 3.8 Spatial transcriptomics in the chicken embryo reveals regulators of hematopoiesis
  • 3.9 The avian thymus and T-cell development
  • 3.10 The bursa of Fabricius, B-cell ontogeny, and immunoglobulins
  • 3.11 Lymphocyte-differentiating hormones
  • 3.12 Development of the immune responses
  • 3.13 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 4. B cells, the bursa of Fabricius, and the generation of antibody repertoires
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 The generation of avian antibody repertoires
  • 4.3 The development of avian B cells
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Structure and evolution of avian immunoglobulins
  • Abstract
  • 5.1 The basic structure of immunoglobulins
  • 5.2 Avian immunoglobulins
  • 5.3 Ig half-life
  • 5.4 Natural antibodies
  • 5.5 Maternal antibodies
  • 5.6 Fc receptors
  • 5.7 Avian antibody responses
  • 5.8 The chicken egg as a source of antibodies
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Avian T cells: Antigen Recognition and Lineages
  • Abstract
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 T cell receptor structure and lineages
  • 6.3 CD3 signaling complex
  • 6.4 CD4 and CD8
  • 6.5 Costimulatory molecules
  • 6.6 T cell lineages
  • 6.7 Methods to study T cell function
  • 6.8 Perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 7. The avian major histocompatibility complex
  • Abstract
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 The biology of the major histocompatibility complex
  • 7.3 The major histocompatibility complex: a genomic region or a biological unit?
  • 7.4 The chicken major histocompatibility complex and the major histocompatibility complex syntenic region
  • 7.5 Classical and nonclassical major histocompatibility complex molecules
  • 7.6 Chicken classical major histocompatibility complex molecules
  • 7.7 Gene coevolution in the chicken major histocompatibility complex
  • 7.8 Other chicken genes important for the major histocompatibility complex
  • 7.9 Polymorphism and typing chicken major histocompatibility complex genes
  • 7.10 Avian major histocompatibility complexes
  • 7.11 Immunity, disease resistance, and the major histocompatibility complex in wild birds
  • 7.12 Sexual selection and the major histocompatibility complex in wild birds
  • 7.13 Origin and evolution of the immune system
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Introduction to the avian innate immune system; properties, effects, and integration with other parts of the immune system
  • Chapter 8.1. Macrophages and dendritic cells
  • Abstract
  • 8.1.1 Introduction
  • 8.1.2 Functional properties of chicken antigen-presenting cells
  • 8.1.3 Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Subchapter 8.2. Avian granulocytes
  • Abstracts
  • 8.2.1 Functional activities of heterophils
  • 8.2.2 Receptors
  • 8.2.3 Other innate immune receptors
  • 8.2.4 Genetic effects on heterophil genotype and phenotype
  • 8.2.5 Heterophil isolation
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 8.3. Thrombocyte functions in the avian immune system
  • Abstract
  • 8.3.1 Introduction
  • 8.3.2 Avian thrombocyte structure
  • 8.3.3 Avian thrombocytes and immune responses
  • 8.3.4 Infection of thrombocytes
  • 8.3.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8.4. Natural killer cells
  • Abstract
  • 8.4.1 Potential natural killer cell receptor families
  • 8.4.2 Phenotype of chicken natural killer cells
  • 8.4.3 Natural killer cell function
  • References
  • Chapter 8.5. Soluble components and acute-phase proteins
  • Abstract
  • 8.5.1 Soluble components
  • 8.5.2 The acute-phase response
  • References
  • Chapter 8.6. Pattern recognition receptors
  • Abstract
  • 8.6.1 Introduction
  • 8.6.2 Tissue fluid and secreted pattern recognition receptors
  • 8.6.3 Cell-associated pattern recognition receptors
  • 8.6.4 Cytosolic pattern recognition receptor
  • 8.6.5 Closing comments: general considerations in pattern recognition
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Avian cytokines and their receptors
  • Abstract
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Avian cytokine and chemokine families
  • 9.3 The interleukins
  • 9.4 Other interleukins
  • 9.5 The interferons
  • 9.6 Other factors
  • 9.7 Chemokines
  • 9.8 Cytokine and chemokine receptors
  • 9.9 The importance of regulation of cytokine responses
  • 9.10 Therapeutic potential of chicken cytokines
  • 9.11 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Immunogenetics and the mapping of immunological functions
  • Abstract
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Genetics and immunological traits in the chicken
  • 10.3 Key gene loci for immunological traits
  • 10.4 Detecting quantitative trait loci
  • 10.5 Statistical procedures for quantitative trait loci detection
  • 10.6 Strategies to use molecular data in genetic selection
  • 10.7 Systems biology
  • 10.8 Transgenic animals
  • 10.9 Future directions for systems biology in avian immunology
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 11. The mucosal immune system
  • Abstract
  • References
  • Chapter 11.1. The avian enteric immune system in health and disease
  • Abstract
  • 11.1.1 General considerations
  • 11.1.2 Gut structure and immune compartments
  • 11.1.3 Development of the enteric immune system
  • 11.1.4 Viral infections of the gut
  • 11.1.5 Bacterial infections of the gut
  • 11.1.6 Parasitic infections of the gut
  • 11.1.7 Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 11.2. The avian respiratory immune system
  • Abstract
  • 11.2.1 Introduction
  • 11.2.2 Anatomy of the respiratory tract
  • 11.2.3 The paraocular lymphoid tissue
  • 11.2.4 Nasal-associated lymphoid tissue
  • 11.2.5 The contribution of the trachea to respiratory tract immune responses
  • 11.2.6 The bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue
  • 11.2.7 The immune system in the parabronchi
  • 11.2.8 The phagocytic system of the respiratory tract
  • 11.2.9 Handling of particles in the respiratory tract
  • 11.2.10 The secretory IgA system in the respiratory tract
  • 11.2.11 Gene expression analysis as a tool to investigate host–pathogen interaction
  • References
  • Subchapter 11.3. The avian reproductive immune system
  • Abstract
  • 11.3.1 Introduction
  • 11.3.2 The structure and function of the avian reproductive tract
  • 11.3.3 Structure and development of the reproductive tract-associated immune system in the chicken
  • 11.3.4 Local and systemic changes to the immune system at the onset of sexual maturity in hens
  • 11.3.5 The innate immune system and the reproductive tract
  • 11.3.6 The reproductive tract immune system in infection
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Impact of the gut microbiota on the immune system
  • Abstract
  • 12.1 Introduction to the microbiota and avian immune system
  • 12.2 Microbiota, metagenome, and microbiome
  • 12.3 GI tract and immune system of poultry
  • 12.4 Influence of the microbiota in immunity
  • 12.5 Gut microbiota–immune system communication
  • 12.6 Gut microbiota: immune homeostasis
  • 12.7 Gut microbiota: immune dysfunction: dysbiosis and inflammation
  • 12.8 Managing the microbiome for immune modulation
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Innate defenses of the avian egg
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Egg basic structures and their role in innate defense
  • 13.3 Modification of egg structures during embryonic development
  • 13.4 Embryonic immunity
  • 13.5 Extraembryonic structures and innate immunity
  • 13.6 Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Avian immunosuppressive diseases and immune evasion
  • Abstract
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Immunosuppression
  • 14.3 Mechanisms of immunosuppression
  • 14.4 Immunoevasion
  • 14.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Factors modulating the avian immune system
  • Abstract
  • 15.1 Endocrine regulation of immunity
  • 15.2 Physiological states
  • 15.3 Dietary effects on immunity
  • 15.4 Assessment of immunocompetence
  • References
  • Chapter 16. Autoimmune diseases of poultry
  • Abstract
  • 16.1 General characteristics of autoimmune diseases
  • 16.2 Autoimmune vitiligo in Smyth-line chickens
  • 16.3 Spontaneous autoimmune (Hashimoto’s) thyroiditis in obese-strain chickens
  • 16.4 Scleroderma in UCD 200/206 chickens
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 17. Tumors of the avian immune system
  • Abstract
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Tumors of the immune system
  • 17.3 Oncogenic mechanisms of tumor viruses
  • 17.4 Immune responses to oncogenic viruses
  • 17.5 Antitumor responses
  • 17.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 18. Practical aspects of poultry vaccination
  • Abstract
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Vaccine types
  • 18.3 Vaccine application
  • 18.4 Factors influencing vaccine responses
  • 18.5 Immunosuppression
  • 18.6 Quality control of response to vaccination
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 19. Comparative immunology of agricultural birds
  • Abstract
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Innate immunity
  • 19.3 Cytokines
  • 19.4 Chemokines
  • 19.5 CCR7
  • 19.6 Cell surface antigens
  • 19.7 Secreted antibodies
  • 19.8 Cell lines
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 20. Evolutionary and ecological immunology
  • Abstract
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Assessing immune function in free-living birds
  • 20.3 Development of the immune system in free-living birds
  • 20.4 Factors causing variation in immune responses
  • 20.5 Molecular variation and evolution in immune genes
  • 20.6 Immune function as an evolving life history trait
  • 20.7 Priorities for future research
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 21. Advances in genetic engineering of the avian genome
  • Abstract
  • 21.1 Methods to manipulate the avian genome
  • 21.2 Genetically modified chickens
  • 21.3 Genetically modified quails
  • References
  • Appendix 1. Genetic stocks for immunological research
  • A.1 Introduction
  • A.2 Major histocompatibility complex lines
  • A.3 General lines
  • A.4 Genetically modified lines
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations
  • Index

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